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LEVEL EIGHT - mixing it up



Backhand roundhouse cutback

The core purpose of the roundhouse cutback is to return a surfer back to the power part of the wave. When done correctly, it can become a very valuable manoeuvre as it can become a ‘major’ turn in a what is a flat part of a wave. It is also a critical linking manoeuvre, potentially setting up the remainder of the ride with speed.

The Roundhouse Cutback put simply is the combination of key foundation manoeuvres, the forehand cutback and the Backhand Re Entry (the rebound).

The Roundhouse cutbacK HAS Four Key Components.


The SET Up

  • Moderate to high entry speed.

  • Create space from the whitewater / pocket to allow room to complete the full cutback and rebound.

  • A shallow, mid face bottom turn enables the above elements of the set up.

The cutback (see backhand cutback in Level 4)

  • Back arm reaching towards the wave face, with pressure on the toe side rail.

  • compressing at the knees.

  • Eyes on the target.

  • HOLD.

HOLDING the compression with the back arm reaching is key to the cutback element of the backhand roundhouse, doing so gives the surfer the speed and centred control to best position them for the next phase.

as the cutback progresses, the surfer needs to begin to look towards the target location of the rebound.

The Transition (SEe FOREhand Bottom turn in level 3)

  • Eyes focused on the target location of rebound.

  • low compressed position.

  • back arm reaching for the wave face.

Rebound (SEe foreHand Re entry in level 5)

  • target to get front 1/3 of nose above lip line.

  • Head turn to look where the turn is to be finished.

  • Rear arm focus, driving through the direction of travel.

  • torso to twist to allow a complete head turn.

  • Finish the rebound in a chest over knee position.

KEYWORDS FOR SUCCESS:

  • mid face bottom turn - shallow entry for maximum speed.

  • Hold - through the cutback and transition, holding the compression and rear arm reaching are key for maintaining speed throughout.

  • Look where you want to go - emphasis on a high rebound.

  • Chest over knee - on exit.

Adam BS Roundhouse.gif
Ada BS Roundhouse G.gif


FOREhand Floater

The forehand floater is a unique manoeuvre, requiring a surfer to ride across the top of a throwing lip line.

In developing surfers the floater is often a ‘go to’ finishing manoeuvre, however it’s greatest purpose is serving as a connecting down the line projection. This enables a surfer to perform a strong, at times major manoeuvre whilst functionally connecting through a fast breaking section of the wave.

Floaters require a moderate to high level of speed, with a Shallow, mid face, Bottom turn.

the approach to the lip line is lateraL, close to horizontal (9pm for Natural footers, 3pm for Goofy Footers) ensuring the surfer’s momentum travels down the line, rather than off the back of the ride.

rather than immediately redirecting the surfboard towards the beach, the surfer is to hold a low, Centred strong position allowing their down the line momentum to carry them across the cascading lip.

To release from the floater, a surfer must first turn their head to look to the landing position.

The rear arm is to drive through the turn, allowing the chest and shoulders to rotate towards the shoreline.

it is critical to project outwards, beyond the exploding white water to increase the opportunity for completion.

with the nose pointing directly to the shoreline, a surfer is to land in the chest over knee position, particularly to absorb any impact from a free fall situation.

FS Floater N.jpg
FS Floater G.jpg

KEYWORDS FOR SUCCESS:

  • Speed - moderate to high speed on entry.

  • Shallow Bottom turn - to ensure lateral approach to lip line.

  • Look to landing - rear arm leading the rotation of chest and shoulders.

  • Nose to beach - finishing chest over knee.

Pat G - FS Floater.gif
Pat G - FS Floater G.gif


BACKHAND FLoater

The Backside floater is more difficult than it’s forehand counterpart.

The backhand floater’s greatest purpose is serving as a connecting down the line projection. This enables a surfer to perform a strong, at times major manoeuvre whilst functionally connecting through a fast breaking section of the wave.

Floaters require a moderate to high level of speed, with a Shallow, mid face, Bottom turn.

the approach to the lip line is lateraL, close to horizontal (3pm for Natural footers, 9pm for Goofy Footers) ensuring the surfer’s momentum travels down the line, rather than off the back of the ride.

rather than immediately redirecting the surfboard towards the beach, the surfer is to hold a low, Centred strong position allowing their down the line momentum to carry them across the cascading lip.

To release from the floater, a surfer must first turn their head to look to the landing position.

The front arm is to drive through the turn, allowing the chest and shoulders to rotate towards the shoreline.

it is critical to project outwards, beyond the exploding white water to increase the opportunity for completion.

with the nose pointing directly to the shoreline, a surfer is to land in the chest over knee position, particularly to absorb any impact from a free fall situation.

BS Floater N.jpg
BS Floater G.jpg

KEYWORDS FOR SUCCESS:

  • SPEED - MODERATE TO HIGH SPEED ON ENTRY.

  • SHALLOW BOTTOM TURN - TO ENSURE LATERAL APPROACH TO LIP LINE.

  • LOOK TO LANDING - Lead ARM LEADING THE ROTATION OF CHEST AND SHOULDERS.

  • NOSE TO BEACH - FINISHING CHEST OVER KNEE.

Backhand Lipline.gif
Backhand Lipline Flipped.gif


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