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LEVEL FOUR - BEYOND THE WHITEWATER

HEADING OUT - SITTING ON THE BOARD - TURNING FOR A WAVE - PADDLING INTO WAVES

BEYOND THE WHITE WATER


HEADING OUT

When entering the break there are 2 common situations you will be faced with.


1/ Entering from the sand

2/ Entering off of rocks


*Before entering the surf always search for potential dangers such as rocks, dangerous rips or currents.


If you are surfing a break you have never surfed before try and watch where other surfers enter the line up. If they’re successful try and take the same route.

When entering the water from the sand you must be aware of how to hold your surfboard. You will most likely have to jump over a few waves with your board under your arm before beginning to paddle.

When jumping over waves standing with board beside body and facing outwards towards the horizon.

If your board becomes more parallel to the beach as a wave hits you it can become difficult to hang onto your board, and also hold your ground.

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Entering the water off rocks is much more difficult than just simply walking off of the beach.

Take your time and be sure to pick where you are going to jump from wisely. Watch where other surfers jump from and monitor their success.

If there is a set approaching the line up, you are best to wait back from the water edge. Let it pass, when there’s a lull in the waves you need to make your move.

Once you are on your rock, ready to jump into the ocean it becomes all about timing. Wait for a wave and jump just over the back of the foam or breaking wave.

It’s very important to get over onto the back of the wave. If you go to early you are at risk of being pushed back over the rocks.



SITTING ON BOARD

When you are out the back patiently waiting for waves, sitting up on your board provides elevated position to help you see what waves are on the way in, and also it will help give your arms, back and neck a rest from paddling.

Similar to paddling:

- Too far forward, nose dive. 

- Too far back,  tail sinking

- Just right, in the middle where the board can sit evenly underwater.

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TURNING FOR A WAVE

There’s a waves on the way in and you’ve decided you want it. 

Turning around and beginning to paddle for the wave is the next step.

If you are sitting on the board you need to:

1: Shift yourself back towards the tail of the board, aim for the nose of the board to be angled out of the water.

2: Move your legs like an egg beater in different directions so your board begings turning.

3: As your board has turned around get back down to your belly and begin paddling

*Try and keep an eye on what the wave is doing at all times.  You may need to paddle to re-position your self for the wave.

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PADDLING INTO WAVES

A common question from all types of surfers is when do I paddle for a wave?

If I paddle to soon the, wave breaks on my back. Too late, I miss the wave.

The answer is a tricky one, because when to paddle for a wave changes depending on the waves shape.

For example, if the wave is very steep you need to delay your paddle until the wave is quite close to you. A steep wave will pick you up easier than a wave that is not steep (flat faced wave) and the opposite. A flat faced wave will need more paddle speed to catch it. So a flatter faced wave will require you to paddle harder and earlier.

The aim for paddling onto any wave is to keep your board and body underneath the waves lip line.

*When paddling for a wave always keep an eye on what the wave is doing at all times. You may need to paddle to re-position your self for the wave. 

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